Community Matters

Skating Rink Redevelopment Project Update - Skating Rink Demolished - July 2019

On behalf of the Rink Demolition Team and the Board of Directors, we are pleased to report that the final phase of the decommission of the Thorncliff skating rink was completed on Saturday, July 6. We commend the Thorncliff volunteers for their professionalism, expertise, and efficiency in completing Phases 1 and 2. 

 

Special thanks to project leads, Doug, the Chair of the Rink Redevelopment Project and Randy, TCL President, and their skilled team members Aldo, Alex, Glen, and Rick. From getting all the necessary permissions and permits, to chain-sawing the fence, to removing and cutting the wire mess, to digging out gate posts, to filling waste bins, to hauling debris to the ECO Centre, to levelling the sea-can, to filling the post holes, to seeding the finished area, they worked tirelessly from beginning to end.  For photos of the demolition in progress see the photo gallery on the main page. Thanks to photographers Sharon and Darlene for capturing the day’s events.

 

Hired Help – we couldn’t do this work by ourselves, so we hired two contractors: JP Bobcat SVC and Bins 4 Rent.com Ltd. We highly recommend both companies and would not hesitate to contract them again.

 

When it came to demolishing the wooden boards and posts, and dropping them into large waste bins, George’s bobcat services were second to none. He used the bobcat to spread 12 yards of earth over the rink area to fill the ruts and level the slope at the south end of the rink. It would have taken our volunteers hours to do this manually. George made everything look easy, but his skill and expertise were apparent throughout the day.

 

Chris, the driver from Bins 4 Rent.com Ltd. was also a terrific help. He showed the guys how to load the waste bins so that everything fit in the two bins we rented. Bins 4 Rent delivered and picked up the bins with precision timing.

 

Next year a snowbank rink will return for everyone’s skating pleasure and for use by the Thorncliff School winter outdoor program. The hockey enthusiasts will have to find another rink to practice their skills as the new skating rink rule will be no pucks no sticks.

 

Once again, the rink was demolished because the boards were rotten, having been built over 22 years ago. The longevity of a wooden rink is 20 years maximum so Thorncliff got its money’s worth. It would take approximately $100,000 dollar to rebuild the skating rink to current standards and that’s a major undertaking that the current Board is unable to manage without a significant number of community league volunteers. Our small board of six people is currently maxed out with the work that we are already doing, but we will continue with the rink redevelopment project and over time will do our best to add some amenities that require low maintenance and operating costs over the long term. That too will require additional funding for which grant applications will need to be written and approved before the work begins.

Five Direct Benefits of Being Part of Community
3. Networking
Think of Community as a living version of Kijiji.  Need a couch, a car, a job, a babysitter?  Being in community puts you in direct contact with people who can help you.  The old saying is valid; "it's not only what you know, but who you know."    
4. Motivation
Think of Community as the spark plug to your ideas and your goals.  Being in community means there are others that share your goals and they can provide the motivation to put actions to your plans.  You are much more likely to carry through with your ideas when someone else is meeting you there, or working on the project with you.

5. Fulfillment
Think of Community as the puzzle that needs your piece.  We carry our own particular shape and ability and personality and we can be complete and confident in our own identity.  Being part of community gives us a bigger picture of how our identity fits in the bigger picture.  As we find our place in community we see the purpose we contribute to the many pieces around us.  
 

Playground Zone Warning - Did you know?
Have you noticed that the City recently replaced the old school zone signs with new playground zone signs by both St. Justin’s and Thorncliffe Elementary Schools along 175 Street?
Have you noticed that new playground zone signs have also been installed along 82 Avenue bordering Thorncliff Park?
Playground zone signs are different from school zone signs because the maximum speed limit of 30 km/hour is between 7:30 am and 9:00 pm seven days a week, 365 days a year, NOT just during school hours during the school year. So SLOW DOWN and keep our children safe in their own community every hour, every day.
If you don’t and you get caught, you’ll get a speeding ticket for at least $80.  And, if you drive through at 15 km/hour or more over the 30 km speed limit, you’ll earn yourself two demerit points.

Off Leash Dogs in the Park

Complaints have been made about dogs being let off leash and not being under control in Thorncliff Park. The biggest complaint has been about owners not picking up after their dogs.
According to City of Edmonton ByLaws, dogs are NOT allowed on parkland property (i.e. Callingwood Park, Thorncliff Park and the Whitemud Green Spaces) even if they are leashed and under control. Dogs are only allowed on City Parkland where signage permits or the area has been designated as a legal off leash area. Thorncliff Park is neither of these but dogs can be walked on the trail system as long as they are leashed and kept at least ten metres from any developed playground or picnic site. 
When that isn’t the case most animal control officers will use their discretion.  If the animal is leashed and poop bags are carried on the owner, and they are not walking or running in the playgrounds or ball fields, etc., they will often let it go.  Since there have been many complaints of uncontrolled dogs in the park and playgrounds, as well as abandoned dog poop, the officers have just reason to enforce the bylaws.

1. Security
Think of Community as the opposite of Isolation.  Isolation means we are alone, nobody knows if we are present or missing, at peace or in trouble.  Being in community means having the security of proximity - somebody that is near enough to see if something is not right or to help or respond if necessary.

2. Opportunity
Think of Community as your personal intelligence gathering agency.  Being in community opens us to increased knowledge and awareness of opportunities.   For example, do you know where the free swimming is available every week?  It's a benefit of being part of Community.

 

Creating Community through our Connections